The After Party: A Short Film

For the past few weeks I’ve been working on the script and location scouting for a project called The After Party. It was our final for my film production class.

Austin Elliot and I wrote the script, and acted in it. Tim Rother wrote the storyboard, edited the script, and directed. I was the post production editor.

Pre-production took place in the two weeks coming up to the shoot, and the actual filming was all done in one night in roughly 6 hours.

The budget was non-existent, so I went and bought a set of camping lights that we used for just about every shot, and things like the shovel came from our houses.

The first track from from Kevin MacLeod, who graciously makes royalty free music for anyone who wants it, and the final piece was my personal favorite song from my best friend Taylor Burdette under the name The Fear of Being Lonely. You can purchase his album here:

https://thefearofbeinglonely.bandcamp.com/album/the-oort-cloud-ep

I wouldn’t say that The After Party is anything incredible, and I could point out a myriad of small mistakes in the final cut, but I’m quite happy with how it turned out. For a couple of students only a few quarters in to film school, our professor and classmates absolutely loved it, and I hope you do too.

Thanks for all the support everyone gave us, and we’re looking to only get better from here.

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Off Duty Dads [A Rainbow Six: Siege Montage]

Like the Glitch Kings 2K12 video before it, I went for a unified style for this (originally 5+ hours) night of Siege.

The idea behind it was a sort of “night on the town” aesthetic, hence the aggressive font choices and gradient flares on the thumbnails, but in the intermittent weeks since its completion I wish that it had made its way into the actual footage. Instead of a static noise and glitch transition, I would have gone for some quick flare flashes, and would’ve changed the somber sounding intro to something better for a party.

Regardless of that, I’m still quite proud of this little project. The animated transitions took a long time to get right, there are a few one-off jokes that are a couple seconds each, and it was easily the hardest I’ve pushed myself to edit out everything that wasn’t great.

The only downside was, because of the intensity of all this, I haven’t recorded any Siege since, and I’ve been playing a good bit less. Personally I’d love to take on a different game, but I haven’t played much else with friends on PC lately.

So what will be next? I dunno. Might be doing film projects for a while longer.

Glitch Kings 2K12 [A Rainbow Six: Siege Montage]

Glitch Kings came from a series of Siege matches wherein instead of playing against random people, we played against our own Skype group. It meant that there was a lot more salt than usual.

As far as editing, this was the first time I tried to go for a unified aesthetic. Everything from the title, to the thumbnail, to the transitions all followed the idea of “glitching out.” I wish I had maybe done a bit more with maybe the sound as well, but at some point I would’ve crossed the line to making the actual game less fun to watch.

The best and worst part about people enjoying this is that now I really want to make all my future videos follow the aforementioned unified aesthetic, and that’s putting me in a tough position for the one I’m currently working on.

Interactive Friction Season 4 & The Making Of A Trailer

After a longer break than I expected, but still appreciated, Interactive Friction has returned. This time however I’m going to work harder to keep on schedule, and I’ve already completed the first step by editing all the footage prior to this trailer going up. Additionally season 5’s raw footage is already mostly recorded, and the audio for our new project is primed for editing. The latter of these should be what to expect next from Brandon and I.

Now about the trailer. Since season 2 I’ve been making an effort to create “teaser” trailers for each upcoming season, though season 3 was the only one that was vague in any sense. Regardless I went with a style much more reminiscent of the Tomb Raider trailer, which is very movie-like in its structure. This time though I went another step further by using the cutscene audio wherein Faith sets up the universe, and that posed a novel challenge for me. For instance, when the helicopter blades come by, I had to find matching footage of a copter for that. Same with the footsteps as the music breaks in.

That aside, producing a trailer made me try and think more about how to engage someone and set up their expectations correctly. Since an average audience wants something interesting within the first few moments, I figured using quick cuts over Faith’s monologue would help keep things moving, with characters relevant to her lines appearing as a bit of foreshadowing for new viewers or a nod to previous players.

I also considered having the trailer start with Faith running down a relatively straight path with these moments cutting in when appropriate, because trying to match the flow and rhythm of the source material is another consideration.

Take for instance this Battlefield 4 fan-made trailer.

While it’s easy to dismiss this for it’s rather standard war movie framework, it’s also indicative of how a normal Battlefield match runs. It weighs heavy on the calm before the storm, and when the chaos begins, it never ends. Makes sense for a 64 player shooter.

For Mirror’s Edge it was difficult to think of a way to capture the essence of running without merely showing part of a level off, but its characters are definitely not its strong suit either. In the end I went with the aforementioned matching of Faith’s dialogue while also trying to find pieces of smooth movement. If I had more time to sort through all the footage I would have loved to capture the moments of distinctive animation when Faith slides down escalators, runs along walls, or seamlessly disarms an enemy without breaking her pace.

Mirror’s Edge is a game of motion, and its trailer should reflect that.

The Texture Pop Podcast Is Over

I originally had a post written up just a few days after this episode aired, but in the following weeks I’ve been pretty well consumed by school and other, more pressing projects.

I suppose in the end that says everything about why the podcast finished in the first place.

Let’s Play Dying Light: Locked Doors And Video Stores

I’ve probably put roughly 15 hours into this video all told. That may seem impossible for just an edited video with few overlays or cutaway gags but it’s mostly in taking the hour and a half or so of footage and paring it down to the video you see here. There’s a constant rhythm of watching a scene, making a cut, re-watching the scene with the cut, and then keeping it, changing where it cuts, or reverting back.

I’m not saying that I didn’t enjoy making this video; quite the contrary. Even now I’ll continue to keep making this videos a lot tighter with better production work (and much better audio), but this was the one that hit my current limit. Between my day job, the blog, the podcast, and other work something is going to have to give for these to get exponentially better without taking months to do.